Faq

Below, you'll find answers to the frequently asked questions about cheese, we get.


Question:

Are speciality cheeses part of the Lactosan portfolio?

Answer:
A variety of special cheeses such as Parmesan, Pecorino, Stilton, Gorgonzola, goat cheese, Norwegian Myseost (Brown Cheese) and naturally smoked cheeses are used for Cheese Powder. In case you need to declare a specific Cheese in your products or advice on declaration of Cheese Powder in general, please do not hesitate to contact us.
Question:

How many varieties of cheese are there and how did it evolve?

Answer:

There are nearly two thousand different varieties of cheese in the world. Cheese has been around since ancient times. 


Murals in Egyptian tombs that depict cheese-making date back to somewhere around 2000 BC but it’s believed that the first cheese was made much earlier, between 8000 BC and 3000 BC. 


It is thought that the first cheese was made accidentally while trying to transport or store milk and probably tasted sour and salty and had a consistency like today’s feta cheese.

Question:

What determines the price of Cheese Powder?

Answer:
Cheese is an expensive raw material and LACTOSAN uses 2 kg cheese to produce 1 kg of Cheese Powder. This means that Lactosan Cheese Powder will be more expensive than cheese. When we remove the water, we concentrate the taste so you'll use lower dosage level. Cost in use should always be considered.
Question:

What is a Danbo cheese?

Answer:

Danbo is one of the most popular Danish cheeses. It is a rectangular cheese with smooth, dry, yellow rind. The cheese has a pale, elastic interior with a few small holes. It is used for snacks and breakfast. Affinage takes six weeks to five months and the fat content is about 45 per cent. Other popular Danish cheeses include Svenbo, Fynbo and Elbo.

Question:

What is Danablu cheese?

Answer:

Danablu (Danish Blue) is a drum or block shaped creamy blue cheese made from cow's milk. This cheese was invented in the early twentieth century by Marius Boel. 


Danablu has a sharp, almost metallic taste, salty bite and feels very creamy in the mouth. The white interior contrasts with blue-black mould, which is rather gritty and salty. 


The cheese ripens in two to three months and the content of fat is 50 - 60 per cent. Danablu is used as a table cheese and is very good in salads. This cheese is also known as Marmora.

Question:

What is Parmigiano Reggiano?

Answer:

Parmigiano Reggiano is an Italian, traditional, unpasteurized, hard cheese made from cow's milk. 


It has a shape of a drum with sticky, hard, yellow to orange rind. The aroma is sweet and fruity, the color fresh yellow and the taste - fruity, like pineapple. Parmigiano Reggiano's flavor is unmistakably piquant. 


Primarily a grating cheese, Parmigiano Reggiano is a great topping for soups, pasta dishes, veal, chicken or salads. In Italy, this cheese is sold in large, grainy chunks, chiseled from the shiny drum that carries its name emblazoned on the rind.

Question:

What is the most popular cheese on a worldwide scale?

Answer:
Cheddar is the most eaten cheese worldwide at the moment. Cheddar is eaten with varying maturation degree from fresh to very matured.
Question:

What makes the holes in a Swiss cheese?

Answer:
The most recognizable characteristic of Swiss Cheese is its holes which punctuate the pale yellow exterior. These holes, also called "eyes," are caused by the expansion of gas within the cheese curd during the ripening period.
Question:

When did the first industrial cheese factory open?

Answer:

The first industrial cheese factory opened in 1815 in Switzerland but successful large-scale production began years later in the United States around 1851. 


During the era of World War II, factory cheese making became more widespread than traditional methods. Factories are now the primary source of cheese in the United States and Europe.

Question:

Who started the production of La Vache Qui Rit?

Answer:

From the 1950s to 1970s, Lactosan produced "La Vache Qui Rit" after having obtained an agreement with the French firm “Fromageries Bel” in 1953. Lactosan’s production of La Vache Qui Rit was sold primarily for the Canadian and North African markets.


Lactosan started producing processed cheese already in 1951. Lactosan’s own brands were for instance Fynbo, Samsoe, Manor and Silver Cheese and key export markets were Eastern Germany, Belgium, the US, the Mediterranean countries and the UK.


In 1951 Christian Jessen, our factory manager from 1948 to 1978, developed a unique technique to produce cheese powder. In the following years, the sale of cheese powder became more and more significant. The production and packing of processed cheese thus became less important and was phased out at the beginning of the 1980s. 


Now more than 60 years later, we continue to be at the forefront, developing new processing techniques and product concepts to help food manufacturers globally meet the challenges of tomorrow’s food markets.


You can read more about Lactosan’s portfolio of products here>>